I’m quite embarrassed to call this a “film” review, since the picture I saw at the cinema was less a movie, but more so a sermon. In fact, Unity’s trailer and official website suggest it’s a documentary, but the film manages to document so little in its hour and a half long running time, that I’m immediately surprised it would ever be considered one.

Unity has this pro-vegan message. It begins with a clip of a cow being murdered, in hopes to capture the audience’s attention, and then begins with the narration of over one hundred different celebrities. In fact, it’s easier to name which celebrities have not lent their voice to the film than to name who has.

unity_ver2I would say my favorite part of Unity was that it suggests its audience is materialistic and far too obsessed with celebrities, when the narrators themselves are extremely wealthy celebrities and make their living off of our materialism and obsessions with their kind. Each time a narrator switches over, we’re treated to the headshot of each accompanied by their name. Every. Single. Time. In fact, some sentences are partially read by different actors, so there’s an eccentric and inordinate pause between words. This completely distracts from whatever point the film is trying to make. Not only that, but its message is obfuscated by the fact that it tries to cram so much into the film, that its sermon says very little at all.

Unity’s filmmakers tell us what it thinks is wrong, but ultimately offers no solution. It’s boring beyond comprehension and Shaun Monson needs to go back to film school or watch more documentaries to see how it’s made. Just because you agree with the film’s message doesn’t make it a good film. The first ten minutes of Monson’s last film, Earthlings, was far more captivating than this entire film. Avoid this one entirely.

  • Michael Lanfield

    I totally disagree with many of the negative reviews on this film UNITY. I found it to be a totally beautiful masterpiece of truth that people just don’t want to hear/see for whatever particular reason. In order for our civilization to continue to thrive and evolve we need to stop seeing and supporting violence and death with our meals and in the world around us. We must stop seeing opposites and perceptions in one another. And because we all came from the same energy source we need to understand that whatever we do to others, we ultimately do to ourselves. A brilliant film and work of art. Thank you for creating this. Highly recommend everyone see this.

    • Ché C Cheriton

      Completely agree Michael. Strange how a film with such a positive message is coming in for so much criticism.

      • Seth R.

        Just because a film has a positive message, it doesn’t mean it’s a good film. I understand the filmmakers mean well, but this documentary is better off having been a book.

        • Ché C Cheriton

          I liked, it was nice to come away from the cinema stimulated rather than numb.

          The message is a pure one and regardless of who narrated it, it was a powerful documentary.

          • Seth R.

            It was certainly a numbing experience for me, but I’m glad you enjoyed it. I’m not saying the message wasn’t any good, because I know they meant well, but it seems most people who are fans are simply fans of it because of the message, but not because of the film is well made itself. It’s more an essay than a documentary. It doesn’t document anything we don’t already know or have not yet seen. However, I am glad you enjoyed it.

          • Ché C Cheriton

            Are you anti-vegan Seth? Did the cow scene not move you?

            There seems to be a pre-determined feel to your review? Much of the review is do with how much the narration annoys you. Is that really a basis for such a damning review? 5%? Come on.

          • Seth R.

            I am not at all anti-vegan. It’s funny, though, as the film is ALL narration. So if the narration is no good, the film isn’t. It was an absolute chore to get through. I checked my watch at least fifteen times at the screening. Most of the footage was stock, which gives me the impression the filmmakers didn’t go out much.

            Also, how is going vegan the solution to war? The film starts off being about animals, but then steers into other territory much more complex. It doesn’t offer solutions, it simply gives us a long-winded recap on what we’re doing and how wrong it is. Food Inc, the documentary, kept me at the end of my seat and in a sense, inspired me. Unity did not. Unity was all show and no substance. Does a film really need over one hundred narrators?

          • Michael Lanfield

            How is vegan solution to war? If we love one another, which is basically what veganism is, loving all beings, how can we commit war and violence? I thought this is common sense??? If we continue violence to animals we will also commit violence to humans. Look at the result of 95% of history, violence. Did it solve anything, no.

          • Michael Lanfield

            We need to unconditionally love everyone that is the only way we will ever survive on this planet. War and violence will not solve anything and it starts with what we put into our mouths the animal foods we consume. If violence solved anything then why do we still have wars and violence on this planet?

          • Seth R.

            If everyone decides to go vegan, it doesn’t mean we’ll randomly become these loving beings. You surely must realize the world you speak of is nowhere close to the one you’re living in.

          • Michael Lanfield

            “In fact, our word “capital” derives from capita, Latin for “head,” as in head of cattle and sheep. The first capitalists were the herders who fought each other for land and capital and created the first kingdoms,
            complete with slavery, regular warfare, and power concentrated in the hands of a wealthy cattle-owning elite.”
            – Will Tuttle, PhD, Author of The World Peace Diet

            “Battling others to acquire their cattle and sheep was the primary
            capital acquisition strategy; the ancient Aryan Sanskrit word for war, gavyaa, means literally “the desire for more cattle.” It appears that war, herding animals, oppression of the feminine, capitalism, and the desire for more capital/livestock have been linked since their ancient birth in the commodification of large animals.”
            – Will Tuttle, PhD, Author of The World Peace Diet

          • Michael Lanfield

            “As long as we remain, at core, a culture that sees animals merely as commodities and food, there is little help for our survival.”
            – Will Tuttle, PhD, Author of The World Peace Diet

          • Ness Steadman

            The origin of capital isn’t just head of cattle, it is head generally: “head” both literally and figuratively in the sense of “first” (as in “capital letters,” so called because sentences and names begin with them), “chief” or “most important” (as in “capital cities,” such as Washington, D.C.), or life itself (as in “capital punishment”). “Capital” also took on the sense of “property” (which is the prerequisite of profit) or “wealth,” which begat not only “capitalism” but “chattel” and even “cattle,” which originally referred to any sort of livestock, not just cows. – http://www.word-detective.com/2009/03/capitalcapitol/

            So to say it was just cattle is a little silly. Like the movie.

          • Ness Steadman

            The narration takes up most of the film. Disjointed, chops between voices mid sentence. And, oh, how long, however, but then, and suddenly, but wait first while you read the titles at the top, then back to the sing a long karaoke narration, and , where was I?

          • Anima2011

            I’m a vegan and I don’t need to see such unbearable scenes as with the cows any more. I suspect, that most people agree, that wars mean hell – but telling such truth in a redundant, not entertaining way is not art for me.

        • Michael Lanfield

          I found it to be a great film and beautiful message. There were of course some minor aspects that could have been improved, but they are outweighed because of the positive aspects.

          • Ness Steadman

            Please. This essay/ audio book with YouTube footage was difficult to read (yes, you had to read the top and read the bottom), contradictory, naive, and well, condescending to anyone over 12 and painful to experience. Hope? Unity? Why all the painful footage? I can watch the nightly news for that.

          • Anima2011

            Message is true, but presentated very very boring…

      • Ness Steadman

        Not strange. It’s poorly made and used the lure of celebrities to get people in to a YouTube video.

    • Anima2011

      I agree with the central message of the film, but I although think , that it is translatet badly.
      I quote Voltaire:
      “Any kind of writing is allowed – only not boring.”

      • Seth R.

        And boy was the film a bore.

        • Anima2011

          Perhaps I didn’t get you right (english is not my mother’s language ), but I found Unity very boring…”a bore” means the same or a man made whole???”

          • Seth R.

            By that I mean it was entirely boring.

          • Anima2011

            Thanks! I agree.

  • Ness Steadman

    Truly painfully awful film. I will need to watch good films for weeks to cleanse myself of this rubbish. Your 5% was generous.

    • Anima2011

      I agree, and I’m a vegan! Don’t waste your time with this bad “movie”. There are cruel impressions and a boring, redundant concatenation of terms. Some of the content is true, but it’s boring and in a leisurely Way manipulative. It seems to me like an advertising clip of a sect, only much longer…