Snubbed being awarded Best Picture from the academy over Argo, Django Unchained is much more fit to stand the test of time.

Django Unchained has all the ingredients of a cult classic. An unconventional script (over-laced with racism), originality, memorable characters and acting, an original score and the bloodshed expected from any Tarantino classic. Although containing elements that feel borrowed from westerns of the past, it still feels fresh.

The plot of the film is a bounty hunter posing as a dentist who teams up with a slave and teaches him to be a bounty hunter, and they embark on a quest to clean up the country of the criminals within it, and rescue the slave Django’s wife from Candyland (a luxurious slavery business). Eventually, Characters are pushed to their limits and showdowns begin to unfold. This is simply a film one should not dare pass up.


Characters in Django: Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz), Django (Jamie Foxx), Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) and Calvin Candy (Leonardo DiCaprio), were played masterfully by all the actors mentioned, and Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for this performance. The others all gave memorable performances.

Cheeky remarks, with unapologetic certitude will slap inevitable smirks and grins on the face of the viewer, thanks to the unforgettable writing of this script. Although rather offensive at times, expect the film to enrapture you, regardless of your race or sensitivity, should you watch it keenly from start to finish.

Excellent cinematography and lush visuals are found in this modern day classic. The sound is perfect, and adequate special features exist on all ownable versions of the film, should one choose to purchase it.

Following the footsteps of Clint Eastwood, Quentin Tarantino continues to make cameos in many of his films (especially the greats), including this one. His white characters display relentless supremacy, but nobody reigns supreme over Django.

A masterpiece bound to no shackles, we’ll be reliving the tale of Django and his triumph for many decades.

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